12 hours with his father behind him to vaccinate him against the Covid: the act of pandemic love of an indigenous young man in the Amazon

The image has turned around the world, and it is not for less. The young Tawy Zó'é, 24, carries his father, Wahu Zó'é, from 67 through the Amazon rainforest

12 hours with his father behind him to vaccinate him against the Covid: the act of pandemic love of an indigenous young man in the Amazon

The image has turned around the world, and it is not for less. The young Tawy Zó'é, 24, carries his father, Wahu Zó'é, from 67 through the Amazon rainforest for 12 long hours. They are Brazilian indigenous people and the goal of such a commendable gesture is none other than allowing man to receive the Vaccine against the Covid.

The scene caught her neurosurgeon and expert in indigenous health in the Amazon Erik Jennings, who has been in charge of the Health of the Zó'é people. He and a team of nurses and dentists fly regularly to the area to meet the needs of the population on a basis created within the area of these indigenous people.

"The population of Zoé is scattered in a territory of 669,000 hectares and is organized in more than 50 different towns," he explains to the world through Instagram. "Mobility in the territory is limited to trails inside the forest." Since the beginning of the pandemic, the Zó'é have been isolated in the most remote villages. They were divided into groups of approximately 18 families and "adopted the strategy not to cross between them and avoid approaching whites."

Dr. Jennings team planned the vaccination of indigenous people: "We build together the safest way of proceeding," says the doctor. "We used some huts of villages near our base, open and airy places, where the Zó'é did not sleep. Each family was vaccinated separately, and they arrived on roads that only they know, to avoid crosses between the groups."

Its tactics had worked for almost the first full year of pandemic, and continued to be used during the first and second dose of the vaccine. "The case of Wahu and Tawy Zó'é is that of a very intense relationship of love, affection and respect between Father and Son," says Jennings, "already before the Tawy pandemic loaded his father in walks among the villages ".

He explains the doctor who is much safer than the indigenous people who move to receive the vaccine, given the complex of the orography. "If we were the peoples would take weeks to vaccinate them all."

Updated Date: 11 January 2022, 10:24

You need to login to comment.

Please register or login.

RELATED NEWS