A Federal Court of Appeals in the USA restores the Anti-Norto Law of Texas

A Federal Court of Appeals in the United States has restored the restrictive anti-aborted land start-up in Texas, only two days after a judge blocking it tempor

A Federal Court of Appeals in the USA restores the Anti-Norto Law of Texas

A Federal Court of Appeals in the United States has restored the restrictive anti-aborted land start-up in Texas, only two days after a judge blocking it temporarily.

The decision to restore the law, entry into force on September 1 and that prohibits virtually any interruption of pregnancy in Texas, took the Court of Appeals from the Fifth Circuit, one of the most conservative in the country.

He was the Attorney General of Texas, the Republican Ken Paxton, who interposed on Friday a resource against the ruling adopted on Wednesday by a federal district judge.

The Court of Appeals did not entertain the issue, but temporarily lifted the blockade waiting for Joe Biden's government, the litigator in the case, responds to the Paxton's resource, for which he has a term until Tuesday.

Whatever the final decision of the Court of Appeals, it is most likely that the case ends again before the Supreme Court, which weeks ago refused to study the law although it admitted that the litigants had raised serious doubts about their constitutionality.

The magistrate that blocked the law on Wednesday, Robert Pitman, said that Texas "has created an aggressive and unprecedented mechanism to deprive its citizens of a significant and well-consecrated constitutional right."

For Pitman, the law "has illegally prevented women from exercising control over their lives" and that their court "will not allow this offensive deprivation to follow one more day."

Texas law allows individuals to present civil lawsuits against any person who helps a pregnant woman to abort whether they believe that they infringe the prohibition, and offers rewards of up to $ 10,000 (8,639 euros) to each plaintiff if he wins the trial.

This system has also allowed that the Texas authorities eluded responsibility for the application of the Law, because the weight of implementation is in those particular citizens, and not in the conservative leaders who driven the veto.

It was that legal vacuum that allowed the law to enter into force a month ago with the approval of the Supreme Court, although it expressly contradicts the judicial decision of 1973 who legalized abortion throughout the United States, known as "Roe versus Wade" .

Texas veto - which prohibits abortion from the six weeks of gestation, when many women still do not know that they are pregnant, is the most restrictive of the 90 who have entered into force this year in territories across the country, driven by leaders Conservatives in state congresses.

Updated Date: 09 October 2021, 17:24

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