A sculptor of Czech imagine the floating home of the future

How and especially in which type of housing will live there in 2050 ? To answer this question, a sculptor of Czech has designed a floating house printed in 3D.

A sculptor of Czech imagine the floating home of the future

How and especially in which type of housing will live there in 2050 ? To answer this question, a sculptor of Czech has designed a floating house printed in 3D. For this he teamed up with a group of architects to create a prototype of a home-garden floating-printed in three dimensions, anticipated as a vacation home of the future.

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Casting concrete special Ceske Budejovice, in the south of the Czech republic, the house should be sent to Prague in August.
Proud of his idea, the brain of the project, Michal Trpak told AFP: "I dare say that this is the very first building floating 3D printed in the world."

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the design of the house, which can be printed in 48 hours, based on the morphology of the protozoa and includes a living room with a kitchen, a bedroom and a bathroom, all of a surface of 43 m2.

In full work, in the middle of the buzzing of a mechanical arm to spout posing patiently, layer after layer, the strips of successive concrete Michal Trpak, clarifies the concept of his work: "The houses 3D adapt to the people or the landscape. The robot does not care about the contour. This home is designed as a place of recreation in the countryside, ideal for a couple or a small family." For these first drawings of the sculptor admits to being inspired housing projects printed in 3D in the netherlands.

If the prototype of this floating home of the future still seems too expensive in the eyes of its inventor - about 112.600 € - Michal Trpak believes that he could easily divide by three this initial cost. Once printed, the modules of the bedroom and bathroom will be attached to a wood core with large windows, and covered with a roof.

The house will then be transported to Prague, installed on a pontoon and towed to the dock on the Vltava, where she will remain for two months. "We had no land for the install, and in any way, to do this, it must be a building permit which takes up to two years", explained Michal Trpak. Before adding with optimism, "But on a river, you need the consent of the agency responsible for the navigation, which is much faster".

According to him, the roof and the walls of this house inspired by nature can be covered in plants. The construction has certainly encountered problems, the concrete used is sensitive to temperature changes during the curing. But Michal Trpak believes hard as iron in his idea: "We will continue to seek and develop this beautiful project. We know that it is a long process that will be strewn with errors and new trials."

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Updated Date: 17 June 2020, 06:47

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