Interpol chooses as president to an emirati accused of torture

The maximum institution in charge of facilitating cooperation between police agencies and controlling international crime has chosen this Thursday, as president

Interpol chooses as president to an emirati accused of torture

The maximum institution in charge of facilitating cooperation between police agencies and controlling international crime has chosen this Thursday, as president, to a presumed criminal. Although the position of him is merely ceremonial, since the day-to-day management is in charge of the Secretary General, the appointment of General Emiratí Ahmed Naser Raisi, accused of torture by five countries, is not exempt from controversy.

The Interpol has announced the decision early in the morning through social networks, unleashing the first criticism. Some remembered the allegations of "tortures" registered in recent months, against the one responsible for the Safety Forces of United Arab Emirates, in countries such as France or Turkey, in whose capital, Istanbul, the summit was held to decide the appointment .

Among those who gave the alarm on the eve of the meeting was Human Rights Watch. The NGO warned that the designation of RAISI could "endanger the commitment of the Global Police Organization with its human rights obligations." According to victims and activists, under the management of the new President of the INTERPOL, multiple crimes were committed, especially related to the persecution of peaceful critics of emiracy policies, such as forced disappearances and torture.

EAU is among the countries that have most abused the so-called red notes. It is a centralized system that should serve to notify INTERPOL countries from the entry of a fugitive criminal at its borders, but which is being used by some countries of weapon to have proof of the movements of its dissidents and take advantage of the Notification to try to repatriate them. Another prodigal nation in this type of practice is precisely Turkey.

Consequently, three members of the European Parliament had written a letter to the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Limen, warning him from the impact that the appointment of General Emirati could have in INTERPOL. "The election of General Raisi could undermine the mission and reputation of INTERPOL and severely affect the ability of the organization to carry out its mission effectively," held in the letter.

In contrast, the rich monarchies of the Persian Gulf have celebrated the appointment of Ahmed Naser Raisi as a triumph of Arab influence. An influence that, according to a report by the former director of the public prosecutor's office, Sir David Calvert-Smith, is adequately accompanied by juicy sums of money. Already in 2017, Calvert-Smith noted in the writing of him that "coherent tests have been found that EAU is trying to improperly influence INTERPOL by financing".

The goal supposedly had the emiratis, according to the British, seems to have been achieved. It is the last of a series of symbolic conquests, but also political, with which small autocratic countries such as EAU are managing to oversize their power on a global scale. This presence and influence allows them to maintain strongly repressive policies at an internal level, to ensure their government, without having to account for them in front of the international community.

Although the position of Ahmed Naser Raisi is honorific, its designation allows to augridgy that the pressure of autocracies on the Lyon-based agency will go to more. Already in the inaugural discourse of the INTERPOL meeting in Istanbul Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, demanded the Interpol more "solidarity to extradite fugitives belonging to separatist organizations and the Fetö Network," name attributed to the Brotherhood of his Exalmed Fethullah Gülen, accused of the failed hit of 2016.

Updated Date: 25 November 2021, 05:47

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