The air pollution can reach the placenta

Exposure to environmental factors during pregnancy and childhood could affect blood pressure According to a study done by scientists in belgium have found par

The air pollution can reach the placenta
Exposure to environmental factors during pregnancy and childhood could affect blood pressure

According to a study done by scientists in belgium have found particulate carbon black on the side of fetal placenta of 28 pregnant women exposed to air pollution . The finding needs additional research to determine whether these particles are able to reach the fetus.

The team detected particles of carbon black in placentas collected from five preterm and 23 term. / Unplash. For years, many papers warn about the negative effects of exposure to air pollution in pregnant women, such as having a premature birth or infants with low birthweight.

in order To improve care during pregnancy in contaminated areas it is necessary to understand how to affect these particles . Now, a new study published this week in Nature Communications describes the existence of particles of carbon black on the side of fetal placenta of the 28 women exposed to air pollution during their pregnancy.The particles of black carbon, more commonly known as soot, is released into the air each day, in large part by the burning of fossil fuels.

Numerous works warn about the negative effects of exposure to air pollution in pregnant women, such as having a premature birth or infants with low birthweight.

Using high-resolution images, the team –led by Tim Nawrot, researcher at the University Hasselt (Belgium) – failed to detect such particles of carbon black in placentas collected from five premature births, and 23 births at term.

Is more, the scientists found that ten mothers who had been exposed to high levels of particles of black carbon residential (2,42 micrograms per m3) during pregnancy had higher levels of particles in the placenta than ten other mothers exposed to low levels (0,63 micrograms per m3).

According to the authors, "to improve care during pregnancy in contaminated areas is necessary to understand how to affect these particles, either directly on the fetus or indirectly through the mother." The authors argue that it is essential to perform more studies to determine if the particles are able to reach the fetus

researchers have described also an overview of the molecular changes in the placenta –including epigenetic– caused by the pollution of the air, in a review article published in the journal Clinical Epigenetics.

The authors argue that it is essential to perform more studies to determine if the particles are able to reach the fetus

however, despite these results, the authors are be cautious and argue that it is essential to perform more studies to determine if the particles are able to reach the fetus. "We need to understand if the accumulation of particles of carbon black in the placental tissue may be responsible for the adverse effects associated with exposure to air pollution during pregnancy," concludes Nawrot.

Updated Date: 18 September 2019, 22:01

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