The challenge for 2050: to eradicate malaria

A vaccine Spanish could lead to a natural immunity against malaria The first vaccine world against malaria is being tested already in some areas of Kenya ,

The challenge for 2050: to eradicate malaria
A vaccine Spanish could lead to a natural immunity against malaria

The first vaccine world against malaria is being tested already in some areas of Kenya , after you have been tested previously in Ghana and Malawi. The vaccine will be introduced within an immunization programme and it is expected that more than 300,000 children receive the vaccine in the next three years.

malaria kills more than 400,000 around the world each year in its most kids , which makes the appearance of a vaccine involving a potential change of stage in the control of this infection. And, according to a report published in "The Lancet", the world would be free of malaria, one of the oldest diseases and deaths that affect humanity, within a generation.

To eradicate the disease in 2050, the authors of the report, 41 experts, suggested three ways of speeding up the decline of malaria.

The existing tools to fight malaria, such as mosquito nets, drugs and poisons , should be used more intelligently, and should develop new tools, such as the s vaccines . In the third place, both the governments of the countries affected by malaria, and as those of countries free of malaria should increase investment in about 2,000 million dollars per year (1,800 million euros) to accelerate progress.

The vaccine is to be introduced within an immunization programme and it is expected that more than 300,000 children receive the vaccine in the next three years.

The ‘war’ against malaria, even though not won, has made significant progress. For example, the number of countries with malaria has dropped from 106 86 , cases have fallen by 36% and the mortality rate has been reduced by 60%.

This is due, in large measure, to the widespread access to measures of prevention of stings of mosquitoes, such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets and better medicines to treat infected people.

But, "despite this, malaria continues to plague certain communities around the world," says Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho, one of the authors of the report, "especially in Africa, where only five countries represent nearly half of the global burden".

Manifesto - The Lancet

The report was commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) three years ago to assess the possibility of eradicating malaria. Forty-one of the world's leading experts on malaria, from scientists to economists, have concluded that it can be done by 2050.

The number of countries with malaria has dropped from 106 to 86, the cases have fallen 36% and the mortality rate has been reduced by 60%.

The assessment of the Commission of "The Lancet" comes a few weeks after the who published its own report on whether malaria can be eradicated, concluding that such a goal cannot be achieved in the short term, and that the establishment of goals that are unrealistic with costs and end results unknown could lead to "frustration and setbacks".

unlike the document of "The Lancet", the WHO says that the priority now should be to lay the groundwork for future eradication "while protecting against the risk of failure that would lead to the squandering of huge sums of money (and) do a disservice to all involved".

The report of "The Lancet", however, believes that, instead of continuing the gradual reduction of malaria cases, under the constant threat of the resurgence, public health authorities worldwide might "choose to commit to an eradication goal in a given period that provides a general purpose, urgency and dedication" to the fight.

The disease affects the entire body, including the brain, and, if not treated, can be fatal.

"For too long, the eradication of malaria has been a distant dream, but now we have evidence that malaria can and must be eradicated by 2050," says Sir Richard Feachem, one of the authors of the report.

malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium that are transmitted from person to person through the bite of mosquitoes. Once infected, people become seriously ill with a fever and severe chills. The disease affects the entire body, including the brain, and, if not treated, can be fatal. Around about 435 000 people, mostly children, die of malaria each year.

Date Of Update: 16 September 2019, 21:00

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