The dramatic personal story that hides after the concert of Aranjuez by Joaquín Rodrigo

This Thursday, the Princess Foundation of Asturias, before the Kings Felipe and Letizia and his daughters, Princess Leonor and the Infanta Sofia (who attended t

The dramatic personal story that hides after the concert of Aranjuez by Joaquín Rodrigo

This Thursday, the Princess Foundation of Asturias, before the Kings Felipe and Letizia and his daughters, Princess Leonor and the Infanta Sofia (who attended this act prior to the delivery of the Foundation awards) honored the composer Joaquín Rodrigo, on the occasion of the 120th anniversary of his birth and the 25 years of the award of the Prince of Asturias Award of the Arts.

In the Auditorium Prince Felipe de Oviedo, the masterpiece of the author, the concert of Aranjuez, which hides a dramatic personal story that Valencian himself lived.

In September 1939, two days after the beginning of World War II, a blind man and his wife crossed the Spanish border from France. They were the composer Joaquín Rodrigo and the Turkish pianist Victoria Kamhi. With them they carried the manuscript in 'Braille' of a score, which would be released a year later at the Palau of Catalan music Barcelona and that he would end up giving his author's immortality: the 'Aranjuez concert'.

Eight decades after its composition and 20 years after the death of Joaquín Rodrigo (Sagunto, 1901- Madrid, 1999), the history of 'concert' is revealed as an intersection of intimate and monumental stories.

First, Rodrigo began the composition of the work when the Spanish Civil War gave his last collets. At the request of the Guitarist Regino Sainz de la Maza, during a meal in San Sebastian, he began writing a concert for guitar and orchestra. It was "a moment of tranquility in those (hours) nothing quiet for Spain and threatening for Europe."

But behind that restlessness there is another story. Seated in France Since 1927, Rodrigo met Victoria in Paris and married in 1933. They went from boyfriend's trip to Aranjuez, where the smells and sounds of water stimulated Joaquín's senses practically blind since three years due to diphtheria.

Months later, Victoria was in Germany about to give birth, but the baby who waited was born dead and the childbirth left her also on the verge of death. As the guitarist Pepe Romero counts, "he only allows her feelings through music". Victoria was still in the hospital "and the pulse of the movement is both the own connection of it with her life as the desire for him to not die."

"The second movement is the reflection of its grief," said Victory itself. "I was very sorry because we had a lot of illusion and when the baby died that we expected was something really sad for both of them, because he was born without life and I was very sick. That was the saddest of our life."

"Sometimes music is very tender, overflowing with love. Other, shows rage. It goes to God, saying: 'Why have you taken the child?' And, at the same time, scared, ask you: ' Please, do not take Victoria, "Romero says.

Updated Date: 22 October 2021, 01:18

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