Trudeau preserves power but can not recover most

He called early elections to try to expand his power in the House of Commons and achieve a more comfortable majority to be able to carry out his economic agenda

Trudeau preserves power but can not recover most

He called early elections to try to expand his power in the House of Commons and achieve a more comfortable majority to be able to carry out his economic agenda without the blockade of the opposition. The bet was risky because Justin Trudeau could have lost the elections. In the end the polls spoke and it was a victory with bitter taste, since he will repeat as Prime Minister of Canada but he will have to continue ruling in a minority.

The Liberal Party of Trudeau managed to add three more seats in the lower house, until reaching 158, but far from the 170 seats he needed to get the majority he was looking for. For its part, conservatives led by their rival, Erin O'Toole, were finally stayed with 119 parliamentarians, sufficient to continue braking the economic plans of the Prime Minister, in a kind of chess game that has finally been left on tables.

"There are still votes to tell, but tonight we have seen millions of Canadians by choosing a progressive plan," Trudeau said before hundreds of sympathizers concentrated in a hotel in Montreal. A resigned prime minister who assured being prepared to form new government with a "clear mandate" to continue working so that the country leave behind the pandemic with a "best future" ahead.

Conservatives did not have more remedy than to take on the results of the elections, but they did not let the opportunity to remind the prime minister the position in which he stays. "Five weeks ago he asked for a majority, because he said that his parliamentary minority was unviable. Canadians have not been given it and have returned to Ottawa with a minority that has cost us 600 million and a greater division in the country," he lamented or 'Toole.

The covers of some of the main Canadian newspapers on Tuesday summarized the environment that is breathed in the streets after the Electoral Day. "Liberals gain another minority" at the 'The Globe and Mail' of Toronto, an "more of the same" on the first page of the 'The Province' of Vancouver or a more than frustrating "All this for this" in ' Journal of Montreal '.

With a parliamentary arithmetic practically similar to the one who was before the appointment with the polls, the feeling of frustration was more than evident. In short two years ago to finish his term, Trudeau wanted to play him with the surveys in his favor, but his margin was narrowing during the campaign, which ended up becoming the most expensive in the history of the country, with an invoice that He ran 400 million euros.

Since it came to power in 2015 after nine years of conservative governments, Justin Trudeau has seen how his popularity rates have been redundant and his image of a new and different leader has worn. Then almost two thirds of the population supported the young prime minister who managed to snatch the power to the "Tories", but now his popularity level between the 36 percent electorate, according to the latest surveys.

With more than 27,000 deaths since the Coronavirus pandemic began a year and a half and 70% of the vaccinated population, the leader of the Liberal Party has been harshly criticized by some of the restrictions he has imposed to combat the crisis, as forced by All public officials are vaccinated before October to not lose their job or demand a vaccination card to travel by train or plane.

Updated Date: 22 September 2021, 14:46

You need to login to comment.

Please register or login.

RELATED NEWS