Europe Tension persists in the streets, but with less participation, on the eleventh day of the strike in France

France celebrates this Thursday a new day of strikes and protests against the unpopular pension reform of Emmanuel Macron

Europe Tension persists in the streets, but with less participation, on the eleventh day of the strike in France

France celebrates this Thursday a new day of strikes and protests against the unpopular pension reform of Emmanuel Macron. It is the eleventh and it takes place one day after the Government and unions met, without success, to try to resume dialogue to find a way out of the conflict.

The main cities of the country have held protests, generally less massive than the previous ones, partly because in France it is a holiday on Friday and next Monday. The CGT has announced 400,000 protesters in Paris, slightly below the 450,000 last week, when a drop in participation was already noted. In cities like Marseille, Rennes or Nantes, the mobilizations have also been somewhat weaker. Police have yet to share their figures.

The demonstration in the capital began on the Invalides esplanade at two in the afternoon and there have been incidents as the procession passed by the La Rotonde restaurant, where Macron celebrated his victory in 2017. It is an emblematic café that Pablo Picasso frequented. Some protesters have attacked it and set fire to the awning. In the final stretch there are also moments of tension with the police.

The authorities had deployed 11,500 agents this Thursday before the possibility of riots. In recent demonstrations there have been incidents, especially clashes between the agents and some protesters. At Paris Charles de Gaulle airport, about 100 protesters this morning blocked a road leading to Terminal 1 and entered the terminal building.

Despite the lower participation, the unions have reiterated their intention to continue with the mobilizations. On Wednesday they met with the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, although the meeting lasted less than an hour and the unions described it as a failure, since the Government does not want to touch a comma on the reform and the organizations have said that they will not return to sit down and talk until the law is withdrawn.

The reform, which seeks to delay the retirement age from 62 to 64 and is opposed by seven out of 10 French citizens, was approved by decree, without going through a vote in Parliament, as Macron was not sure he had the Sufficient support in the Hemicycle.

The unions have not yet announced when the new mobilization day will be, which would already be the twelfth, although next week will be key, since the Constitutional Council must decide whether to approve the reform. The unions and the opposition denounce that the procedure used to approve it (such as a financial law) is a legal shortcut and invalid.

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