Israel-Gaza War The most intense fighting in the two months of the war

The war between Israel and Hamas crossed the two-month threshold with intense fighting in the Gaza Strip without, for the moment, a ceasefire appearing on the horizon in exchange for the release of those kidnapped by the fundamentalist group on December 7

Israel-Gaza War The most intense fighting in the two months of the war

The war between Israel and Hamas crossed the two-month threshold with intense fighting in the Gaza Strip without, for the moment, a ceasefire appearing on the horizon in exchange for the release of those kidnapped by the fundamentalist group on December 7. October.

The most intense hand-to-hand clashes since the start of the Israeli ground incursion on October 27 take place in Jabalia and Shujaiya, in the north of Gaza, and in Khan Younis, in the south where 1.7 million of the 2.3 million inhabitants of the enclave face shortages of resources, space and security.

Israel's military superiority is overwhelming not only due to the Air Force and technology but also due to the massive presence of troops represented in four divisions against an armed group that resorts to assets such as the best knowledge of the terrain and the extensive network of tunnels and hidden explosives. underground. Of the five soldiers killed in combat in the last day in the Gaza Strip, that of the son of the former head of the Army and current centrist minister in the war cabinet Gadi Eisenkot caused a great impact in Israel. Gal, a 25-year-old reservist, was killed by a bomb activated as he approached the opening of a tunnel in Jabalia.

Although the Army has 89 casualties in its ranks in Gaza, the death toll from Hamas and Islamic Jihad is much higher. Yahia Sinwar's group does not give figures of its casualties beyond the announcement of the death of leaders of its armed wing. The Hamas-controlled Health Ministry indicates that 17,177 Palestinians have been killed since the start of the Israeli offensive.

The announcement of the siege of Sinwar's house in Khan Yunis is more symbolic than practical since the fundamentalist leader has been in a tunnel since before his attack in Israel (1,200 dead and 240 kidnapped). "Sinwar is not on the surface but underground. Our mission is to find him and kill him like the rest of the terrorist group's leadership," warns military spokesman Daniel Hagari.

Gaza produced two events this Thursday with significance in the field of psychological struggle. On the one hand, the Israeli takeover of Palestine Square where Hamas used to hold its demonstrations and, a week ago, the handover of hostages. On the other hand, the arrest of dozens, mostly members of Hamas and other groups. According to military sources, it is the largest surrender by Hamas since the start of the war, although Palestinian sources indicate that there are also many civilians.

Under pressure from Washington, Israel decided to increase fuel entry into Gaza. From 60,000 liters per day it goes to 120,000 while the US expects it to reach 180,000. They are more than the liters that the Israeli leaders promised after 7-O as pressure and to prevent Hamas from using it for their tunnels, but less than what the population needs. According to the cabinet, it is about "allowing the minimum addition of fuel necessary to avoid a humanitarian collapse and the outbreak of epidemics in the southern Gaza Strip." Israel understands that it will not be able to continue with the enormous American support at the diplomatic (UN) and military level (for example, it fills reserves of missiles that neutralize the projectiles fired by Hamas) without meeting its demands regarding the Gazan population (minimize civilian deaths and increase humanitarian aid).

Yesterday a crowd gathered in front of a UNRWA (UN Agency for Palestinian Refugees) warehouse in Deir al Balah, in the center of the Strip, to ask for food. The anger of the inhabitants is not only directed towards Israel but also increasingly towards Hamas given that its militiamen are in the tunnels and several of its leaders in Qatar while they suffer a devastating war firsthand. "The humanitarian situation is catastrophic, one of the worst we have witnessed and will likely worsen as hostilities continue," warns UNWRA, denouncing: "The 2.3 million inhabitants lack sufficient food and drinking water, and face the desnutrition".

Hamas leader Ismail Haniya says they are ready for a new exchange if Israel stops the offensive. The mediators are trying to convince the Islamists to release the women and children remaining in captivity and Israel to negotiate first over other categories of hostages to be released.

The testimony of kidnapped people already at home about psychological terror, beatings and sexual violence increases the pressure on Benjamin Netanyahu to put their release above the other stated objective of the offensive (ending Hamas) while he asks the Red Cross to resort to to Qatar, "since it is proven that it has influence over Hamas" so that they can visit the 138 people still in captivity.