Walker posts photo: "Half pig, half fox" – people in Manchester puzzle over mysterious animal

Manchester has its summer animal.

Walker posts photo: "Half pig, half fox" – people in Manchester puzzle over mysterious animal

Manchester has its summer animal. The creature probably doesn't have as much sensational potential as in "Kaiman Sammy", who once made a quarry pond unsafe or "Problembär Bruno", which tragically ended up as a stuffed exhibit in a Munich museum. In the summer when there is little news, they are often there, these mysterious animals.

A photo of an animal is currently a hot topic on the Facebook group in the small town of Heywood, Greater Manchester, since a user posted it there on Wednesday morning. He recorded it that same morning while walking in a park, he writes. And he got quite close to the creature, because it's easy to see in the photo.

But what kind of animal is that? On Facebook, users are guessing. "It's a bear," someone wrote - most of the other group members did not share this assessment, for the animal looks too small for a bear. Others guessed fox or mink. And one comment reads: "It looks like half pig, half fox".

The author of the photo, whose first name is John, also shared his discovery with the local press, which now has a strong suspicion as to which animal is pacing through the small Queen's Park: It could be a forest dog - several in the Facebook group also suspect this users.

This small wild dog species usually lives in South America - or European zoos, including England. The forest dog is described as an animal with a squat body about 60 to 75 centimeters long and short legs. Photo comparisons on the net show: Could fit. So far it is unclear how he got into Queen's Park.

Several users advised user John to call the animal protection organization RSPCA so that the - alleged - forest dog is brought to safety. Maybe even the zoo he may have escaped from.

Forest dogs are carnivores that also hunt for prey in water. Among other things, they feed on small rodents and like, for example, armadillos, coatis or even an opossum. In the English park, the animal probably had to change its eating habits. But to get enough in the wild in England, a tasty rat might do the trick.

Sources: Heywood's Facebook group, "Manchester Evening News", ITV, Chester Zoo, "Spiegel.de"

Yorum yapabilmek için üye girişi yapmanız gerekmektedir.

Üye değilseniz hemen üye olun veya giriş yapın.

NEXT NEWS