What will happen if Elisabeth Borne doesn't submit to the Assembly’s vote of confidence?

Will the Prime Minister hold her government responsible to Parliament? Matignon seems to continue the confusion.

What will happen if Elisabeth Borne doesn't submit to the Assembly’s vote of confidence?

Will the Prime Minister hold her government responsible to Parliament? Matignon seems to continue the confusion. BFMTV spotted a decree in the "Official Journal" on Wednesday, June 29. It convenes Parliament in an extraordinary session Tuesday, July 5. After her general policy declaration, however, no confidence vote is mentioned in the session.

BFMTV was assured by Olivia Gregoire, a spokeswoman for the government, that "no decision had been made yet." After a visit at Family Planning headquarters, the main interest party confirmed this. Elisabeth Borne stated that there is no decision made, but it is something that merits thought. The Prime Minister stated that she would take her decision "after consultations (with various parliamentary groups)" but that she would announce it "when the time is right".

Elisabeth Borne is not likely to take on its responsibility before the deputies. The Prime Minister cannot be certain that he will collect the votes needed to stay in office, as Emmanuel Macron has a relative majority in the National Assembly. This vote of confidence is symbolic, but also symbolic. It is a "procedure to question the responsibility of government", recalls Palais-Bourbon. Elisabeth Borne has therefore the obligation to secure an absolute majority (i.e. For her government to continue in place, she must get 289 votes from 577) but officially the president's majority has only 245 deputies.

The Fifth Republic tradition dictates that a new head is elected to the presidency. This is a speech that outlines the policy direction of the government. Confidence. However, Elisabeth Borne is not obligated to request the confidence of the deputies. The Constitution, Article 49 paragraph 1, provides that the Prime Minister can initiate this vote of confidence after the Council of Ministers has deliberated, but she is not required to do so.

With the support of its deputies, the vote of confidence gives the government greater legitimacy. Elisabeth Borne wouldn't be the first person to break with tradition. After the 1988 dissolution of Francois Mitterrand's National Assembly, the latter didn't get an absolute majority. None of the three following Prime Ministers, Edith Cresson (1991-1992), Pierre Beregovoy (1992-1993), and Michel Rocard (1988-1991), gave consent to the vote.

Already, there has been a reaction to the decree that was published in the "Official Journal". "A break with republican tradition and a denial democracy!" In a tweet, Clementine Autain (deputy LFI) said that.

"Elisabeth Borne flees, taking democracy with her", also lashed out at Mathilde Panot (president of the LFI group) and denouncing a "permanent military coup".

Fabien Roussel (national secretary of the Communist Party), was questioned about Europe 1. He asked "the government to make every effort necessary and to submit a vote of confidence." He said, "That's normal. That's how parliamentary democracy works."

Eric Coquerel (Nupes candidate for the presidency on the Finance Committee), a "rebellious" MP, implied that Elisabeth Borne would not be able to resort to the vote-of-confidence. The LFI group could then table a motion to censure, another legislative tool that would set off a debate in the Assembly and trigger a vote two days later. This vote is likely to overthrow government.

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