Sheffield Hallam: Sherwood writer is concerned about uni's English Lit course

Sherwood, author of BBC drama Sherwood, warned that fewer opportunities to study arts and humanities will lead to fewer writers and artists in the working class.

Sheffield Hallam: Sherwood writer is concerned about uni's English Lit course

Sherwood, author of BBC drama Sherwood, warned that fewer opportunities to study arts and humanities will lead to fewer writers and artists in the working class.

James Graham spoke out following the decision of Sheffield Hallam University to discontinue teaching English Literature.

He blamed the "huge reduction in time given to the arts at state schools", which meant fewer course applications.

According to the university, English Literature will be a part of a broader degree.

A spokesperson for Sheffield Hallam stated that the current course would be continued during this academic year but would be suspended starting September 2023.

They explained that the move was related to demand and application numbers. It was also part of a small number of courses being closed or suspended.

According to the university, there would be no job loss as a result.

Sheffield Hallam spokesperson stated that the university offers more than 600 undergraduate and graduate degrees. To ensure that our courses meet employers' needs, we constantly review them.

The university cautioned against combining the changes to its English Literature course and any larger debate about government funding.

Graham stated that it was important to talk about the arts and humanities opportunities for young people of all backgrounds.

He said that in normal state schools there has been a significant reduction in teaching time, funding, and the emphasis on drama, music, and art, among other things.

"You're seeing a huge reduction in school plays and orchestras. These young people will be applying for higher education because they have been taught for years that these subjects are less valuable. "I fundamentally disagree."

Jo Grady, University and College Union general secretary, stated that Sheffield Hallam's decision was "as surprising as it is depressing", and added that it "seems to be part of a larger agenda being forced upon universities by the government against arts and humanities".

Dr Grady warned that the Sheffield Hallam decision and similar moves in Huddersfield, Wolverhampton and elsewhere would be "hugely detrimental for access".

She said that universities with higher numbers of students who are less financially secure are the most vulnerable. It is not right to deny them the opportunity to study literature, art, and music.

Graham, who studied drama at University of Hull, stated that "Officially, you don't have to get a degree to be an artist. But for me, coming from a less working-class background, I needed the encouragement, support, and guidance of my university degree to become a playwright."

For Mr Graham's comments, the Department of Education was contacted.

Follow BBC Yorkshire on Facebook and Instagram. Send your story ideas to yorkslincs.news@bbc.co.uk.

Yorum yapabilmek için üye girişi yapmanız gerekmektedir.

Üye değilseniz hemen üye olun veya giriş yapın.

NEXT NEWS