Academy of Motion Image Arts and Sciences apologizes for Oscars mix-up

Everybody's talking about Sunday's Oscars gaffe for the duration of which Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway incorrectly announced "La La Land" as the very best image winner as an alternative of Moonlight. Monday, it was the The Academy of Motion Image Arts...

Academy of Motion Image Arts and Sciences apologizes for Oscars mix-up

Everybody's talking about Sunday's Oscars gaffe for the duration of which Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway incorrectly announced "La La Land" as the very best image winner as an alternative of Moonlight. Monday, it was the The Academy of Motion Image Arts and Sciences' turn to weigh in.

The Academy released a statement that read, "We deeply regret the blunders that were produced through the presentation of the Greatest Picture category for the duration of final night’s Oscar ceremony. We apologize to the whole cast and crew of 'La La Land' and 'Moonlight' whose encounter was profoundly altered by this error. We salute the tremendous grace they displayed below the circumstances. To all involved -- which includes our presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, the filmmakers, and our fans watching worldwide -- we apologize."

The statement continues: "For the final 83 years, the Academy has entrusted [PriceWaterhouseCoopers] to manage the crucial tabulation process, like the precise delivery of final results. PwC has taken complete responsibility for the breaches of established protocols that took location through the ceremony.

"We have spent last night and today investigating the situations, and will identify what actions are proper going forward. We are unwaveringly committed to upholding the integrity of the Oscars and the Academy of Motion Image Arts and Sciences."

Shortly after the ceremony, PriceWaterhouseCoopers issued their personal apology, saying in a statement that the error occurred because the presenters have been provided the incorrect envelope.

Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs was understandably upset by the entire affair. A writer for the New Yorker was backstage at the Oscars and happened upon Isaacs just following it occurred. Her reaction? "Horror," she told him. "I just thought, Oh, my God, how does this occur? How. Does. This. Take place. And it was such a superb show.”

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