Pat Robertson leaves the long-running 700 Club as host

After half-century of running the "700 Club" daily TV station in Virginia, Pat Robertson is retiring, the Christian Broadcasting Network announced Friday.

Pat Robertson leaves the long-running 700 Club as host

Robertson, 91, stated in a statement that Friday was his last broadcast of the network's flagship program. His son Gordon Robertson will host the weekday show beginning Monday.

Robertson announced that he will not be hosting the "700 Club" show. However, he said that he would return to the show from time-to-time if he has a "revelation". "I am grateful to God for all those who have been involved. "I want to thank you all."

Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network began airing in October 1961, after he purchased a failing UHF television station from Portsmouth, Virginia. In 1966, the "700 Club" was launched.

CBN is based in Virginia Beach and claims its reach extends to over 100 countries and territories through television and video evangelism as well as online ministry and prayer centres. You can watch the "700 Club" talkshow in all major U.S. TV markets.

John C. Green, an emeritus professor of political science at The University of Akron, said that "Pat Robertson had a tremendous impact on both American faith and American politics."

Robertson's "700 Club" innovation was to use the secular talk-show format. This was a break with more traditional broadcasts of church services or revival meetings.

Green stated, "Here's an educated person having sophisticated conversation with a wide range of guests on many topics." It was with a religious inflection, to be certain. It was a way that addressed everyday problems.

Robertson attracted large audiences and was later invited by several U.S. presidents, including Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter and Donald Trump, according to the network.

Robertson, the son of a U.S. senator, received a Yale law degree. Robertson ran for president in 1988. He also founded the Christian Coalition which galvanized evangelicals to become a conservative political force.

Green stated that "He opened up the path that many people have followed." Surveys have shown that many people watch religious broadcasting in any format these days. In politics, however, I believe he helped to cement the alliance between conservative Christians & the Republican Party.

Robertson was sometimes in trouble for his comments on air as "700 Club" host. He called for the assassination Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in 2005 and warned Pennsylvanians not to be surprised if disaster strikes them. This was after they elected school board members who supported teaching "intelligent designs."

Robertson also called to end mandatory prison sentences for marijuana possession convictions. Robertson later stated on "The 700 Club", that marijuana should be legalized, and that it should be treated as alcohol because the government's war against drugs has failed.

Robertson stated that Trump was in an "alternate reality" after he lost to Joe Biden in 2020. News outlets reported that he should "move forward".

Robertson will continue to appear on The 700 Club's interactive, monthly episode. He will also be on the show "occasionally as necessary," according to the network.

Gordon Robertson (63), a Yale-educated ex-real estate lawyer, is not as well-known as his father. CBN's chief executive officer, he has been the executive producer of "700 Club" for over 20 years and as a cohost even longer. He hosts the show "700 Club Interactive".

According to him, viewers can expect little to no changes to the show's content on Friday. It airs live every day from 9 a.m. to 10. 00 a.m. weekdays.

Robertson, the younger, said that he would love to host politicians from both parties while also focusing on news from a Christian perspective.

He stated that he wanted the show to be "a beacon for light about what happens when people come together and say, "Let's do some kind in the world today."

He continued, "Let's help the hungry." Let's clothe those who are naked. Let's provide shelter for those in need. Let's show compassion and love when disasters happen.

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