Javier Milei in a poncho, maybe that’s a detail for you…

It's already Christmas in Argentina

Javier Milei in a poncho, maybe that’s a detail for you…

It's already Christmas in Argentina... In Buenos Aires, Saturday December 9, on the eve of his official inauguration as head of the country, Javier Milei met Paraguayan President Santiago Peña and was given a prestigious gift which he did not fail to put on immediately, suddenly changing his appearance. In fact, there is nothing trivial about this poncho. Named “Poncho Para’í de 60 Listas de Piribebuy”, it is even the pride of the Paraguayan town of Piribebuy.

So how is this poncho different? Like the other ponchos, the “Poncho Para’í de 60 Listas de Piribebuy” measures 2 meters long and 1.15 meters wide and has a central hole allowing your head to slip through. It has sixty stripes (hence its name). But it is above all its construction that makes it unique. So this poncho is made thread by thread collectively by the artisans of Piribebuy, who pass on this know-how from mother to daughter. In 2005, these techniques were even listed as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

If this spectacular poncho attracts the eye and attention, it obviously does not make us forget the improbable hair attribute with which Javier Milei is adorned. Since his appearance on the public scene, he has displayed this cut that could be placed somewhere between that of Hugh Jackman in the X-Men saga and that of Elvis during his uninhibited sideburns period, in the early 1970s. Grotesque? Without a doubt. Effective ? Equally. Because, when we talk about Javier Milei's hair, we are not talking about his populist, racist, misogynistic, retrograde ideas...

In this image, the presidents of Argentina and Paraguay both give a thumbs up. Friendly ? Appearances can be deceiving. In Iran, for example, a thumbs-up is indeed historically perceived as an aggressive gesture and even as the equivalent of a middle finger.

How can we not note the presence, in this image, of works of striking ugliness? On the wall, behind Javier Milei and Santiago Peña, hang three paintings in turquoise tones, giving pride of place to the dripping technique, consisting of letting paint flow onto the canvas. Popularized by Jackson Pollock, who became its leading figure, the technique was in fact invented by the American-Ukrainian Janet Sobel (1894-1968), largely forgotten by history, like many female artists. So let's give him back what's his.