Baltimore mayor to announce update on schools funding Monday afternoon

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, city schools CEO Sonja Santelises and members of the Baltimore delegation in Annapolis are scheduled to announce Monday afternoon results of their efforts to shrink a $130 million budget deficit facing the city school district...

Baltimore mayor to announce update on schools funding Monday afternoon

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, city schools CEO Sonja Santelises and members of the Baltimore delegation in Annapolis are scheduled to announce Monday afternoon results of their efforts to shrink a $130 million budget deficit facing the city school district next year.

School officials have warned the unprecedented shortfall could cause more than 1,000 layoffs, increased class sizes and canceled arts programs.

The announcement is scheduled for 4:15 p.m. Monday in Annapolis.

On Thursday, teachers, parents and students rallied outside the State House in Annapolis to demand more money for their schools. District officials anticipate a $42 million cut in state aid in next year's budget. The crowd called on Pugh to promise more money. She answered by saying an update would come Monday.

School officials have said they've been working to secure more money, both from the state and city, to shore up their budget for next school year. Some $80 million in the cuts would fall to the school buildings themselves.

Baltimore school officials have asked state and city lawmakers for $65 million to shrink their $130 million budget deficit and help them avoid laying off more than 1,000 workers.

But schools CEO Sonja Santelises said she has "no firm commitments" from the State House or City Hall. And even with...

Baltimore school officials have asked state and city lawmakers for $65 million to shrink their $130 million budget deficit and help them avoid laying off more than 1,000 workers.

But schools CEO Sonja Santelises said she has "no firm commitments" from the State House or City Hall. And even with...

The funding per student at traditional schools would plunge by $1,093, or nearly 20 percent from last year. Funding at charter schools would drop $494 per student, or 5 percent. Charter schools would receive $8,778 per student. Traditional schools would receive $4,585. Under an agreement with the district, charters receive more money but must pay for their own essential services such as insurance, principal salaries, busing and building costs.

It's the largest budget gap the district has faced in recent history. School officials have cited declining enrollment, rising teacher salaries, an ambitious school construction program and pre-kindergarten as contributors to the deficit. Enrollment stands at about 82,000 students. The district expects to lose nearly 1,000 next year.

A rally for education funding takes place at Lawyer's Mall. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun video)

A rally for education funding takes place at Lawyer's Mall. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun video)

The Trump administration revoked federal requirements for public schools to let transgender students use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their gender identity.

The Trump administration revoked federal requirements for public schools to let transgender students use bathrooms and locker rooms matching their gender identity.

By July, school officials say, state funding for the district will have fallen $79 million over four fiscal years. The city's contributions will have edged up by $13 million over those years.

tprudente@baltsun.com

Our editors found this article on this site using Google and regenerated it for our readers.

You need to login to comment.

Please register or login.

RELATED NEWS