Could the hotter weather to stop the spread of the corona virus?

In an interview with the daily News, says the statsepidemiolog Anders Tegnell, to the spread of infection of the coronavirus covid-19 is likely to continue in C

Could the hotter weather to stop the spread of the corona virus?

In an interview with the daily News, says the statsepidemiolog Anders Tegnell, to the spread of infection of the coronavirus covid-19 is likely to continue in China for the summer, and before that, possibly, will settle down.

the Reason for that is that the temperatures are rising.

"We already know that the virus doesn't spread as well in hot weather," says Tegnell.

Donald Trump attracted a lot of attention when he suggested that the outbreak would be over by april, as the ”heat in general kills this kind of virus.”

However, it is still unknown whether the coronavirus is going to react the same way in the heat of a säsongsvirus.

"Policymakers should not rely on the fact that the warmer temperatures are going to save us from the covid-19," says Thomas Bollyky, director of the Council on Foreign Relations global health program, for Time Magazine.
”it Will be very difficult to stop the ' Bollyky, pointing to a previous outbreak of a coronavirus, such as sars and mers, does not show any signs of being säsongsstyrda.

with the Outbreak of the sars epidemic ended in July 2003, however, it is not clear whether it was the warmer temperatures. And the spread of the mers, who first were in the kingdom of saudi Arabia, was likely about the time of the year.

Marc Lipsitch, an epidemiologist at Harvard university, is on the same track. He told National Geographic that the weather changes are not likely to have any significant effect on the new virus activity.

the spridningstakten would decrease in the summer, it does not mean that the virus is gone for good. Covid-19, have been to all the continents except Antarctica, and in the southern hemisphere, waiting for a new season.

But a joint effort to halt the spread, there is a risk that the coronavirus is evolving into a säsongsvirus, " says medicinprofessorn Charles Chiu of Time Magazine.

" If we continue to see long-lasting transfers between countries, it will be very difficult to stop the virus.

the Dry and cold air favours the spread
There are a number of reasons that the flu season is generally linked to the winter season. A popular theory is that people spend more time indoors, which makes for a better spridningsmiljö. Studies also show that in the dry, cold air might be conducive to the spread of the virus, writes National Geographic.

" Ian Lipkin, at Columbia university's center for infection and immunity, has been studying the new coronavirus. He told the paper that the sunlight can help break down the virus, which has been spritid to adapt to a variety of surfaces.

" It's been almost a sterilizing effect. It's overall cleaner outdoors than it is indoors because of the UV light.

on the other hand, it is not clear how the rise in temperatures, particularly in a warming climate might influence the spread of various diseases in the long run.

In an interview with the Expressen, " points out the researcher, Ann Albihn, that many of the infections are affected by global warming. In the future, the kingdom of Sweden are more affected by the viruses and bacteria that are spread by, for example, mosquitoes, ticks, and water.

" more than two-thirds of all infectious diseases affecting humans are zoonotic, and, therefore, can be transmitted between animals and humans. It's a very, very large percentage of our infections. Coronavirus is believed, for example, going from a market that sold live animals, " she says.

READ MORE: the Risk of infections is growing – may be hidden in the ground. READ MORE: : Questions and answers on the new coronavirus, LEARN MORE: : the Alexandra, 29, preppar of the outbreak of the coronaTV: extensive work is in progress to develop drugs and vaccines against coronavirus

Updated Date: 03 March 2020, 13:00

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