Boris Johnson: Housing campaigners get a kick in their teeth by firing Gove

According to a housing activist, the firing of Michael Gove is "a kick in their teeth" for tenants' right.

Boris Johnson: Housing campaigners get a kick in their teeth by firing Gove

According to a housing activist, the firing of Michael Gove is "a kick in their teeth" for tenants' right.

Kwajo Tweneboa, a social housing activist, said that Gove was the first community secretary to ask his opinion on new housing laws.

Boris Johnson resigned him amid a wave of resignations from ministers.

Johnson, the leader of Conservative Party, has resigned and Greg Clark has taken over Mr Gove's position as ministerial.

The party has appointed a temporary leadership team to oversee the new secretary of state for levelling-up, housing, and communities until Mr Johnson is replaced as prime minister.

Tweneboa, a campaigner for better housing in London, stated that he felt "pure anger and disappointment" at Mr Gove's dismissal by the prime minister.

He expressed his dismay at the decision, which he described as "setting us back massively" in relation to all of the progress made, including new legislation.

He stated that "For Boris Johnson to fire Michael Gove, especially considering the state of housing during the worst crisis of my life and many others have experienced in their lives - it's a complete kick in the teeth. It's a disgrace from someone who was supposed to lead the nation and put the country's needs before their own,"

Housing campaigner, John Johnson, said that Johnson had "put his selfish needs before the needs of social housing tenants". He left Gove, whom he claimed was the first housing minister who approached him and took his ideas on board.

He said, "It just doesn’t happen." "I'll be blunt. Previous housing ministers didn't take it seriously and were totally useless, but I believe [Mr Gove approaching] me was a positive sign."

Many meetings were held to discuss legislation, Mr Tweneboa stated. He and other housing campaigners were asked if they thought the legislation was good enough or beneficial enough.

He is now concerned that his unique access to creating the legislation necessary to protect tenants may be lost when a new minister assumes the reins.

He stated that it "sets us back massively" and that we should be alarmed because it has halted any progress in housing.

Tenants were left to deal with cockroaches, mice and poisonous spiders by landlords or housing associations that are not trustworthy.

Greg Clark, the new secretary of state, must "ensure tenants are given power which they deserve" according to Mr Tweneboa. This will be done through strengthened legislation and sanctions against housing providers who neglect or abuse tenants.

Mr Tweneboa stated that sanctions could include fines for housing association members, as well as professional registers from which the worst offenders could possibly be struck off.

He said that it was important to take the issue seriously and that tenants who live in disrepair properties should not be forced to rent.

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