Commandments confusion

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.Updated 51 minutes ago Regarding the news story “Ten Commandments to be removed from Valley High School in New Kensington” : I continue to be confused by courts ruling in favor of the Freedom From Religion Foundation's...

Commandments confusion

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Updated 51 minutes ago

Regarding the news story “Ten Commandments to be removed from Valley High School in New Kensington” : I continue to be confused by courts ruling in favor of the Freedom From Religion Foundation's lawsuits concerning Ten Commandments displays, stating they violate the First Amendment, which states: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof … .”

First, the school districts or other public properties where the commandments are displayed are not “Congress.” Second, those displaying them are making “no law,” nor do they have the power to do so.

Third, none of these establishments are advocating for the “establishment of religion.” Fourth, these establishments are not prohibiting the “free exercise” of the FFRF to deny that there is a God or to disbelieve the commandments. Its members are free to express their beliefs in the same fashion as Jews, Catholics, Methodists, Lutherans or Presbyterians.

Fifth, of the many religions that believe in the commandments, which are the establishments advocating for? Lastly, nowhere is it stated in our Constitution that disagreeing with the beliefs of any person or group of people is unlawful.

I am not in agreement with the beliefs of FFRF, but I do respect its right to hold them. However, I do not agree that its members should be able to force their beliefs onto the rest of our society.

David King

Hempfield

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