Ex-columnist for the NY Times ineligible for Oregon governor

SALEM (Ore.) -- Thursday's ruling by the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that Nicholas Kristof, a former columnist for The New York Times, is not eligible to run as governor. He does not meet the state’s three-year residency requirement.

Ex-columnist for the NY Times ineligible for Oregon governor

Ex-columnist for the NY Times ineligible for Oregon governor

SALEM (Ore.) -- Thursday's ruling by the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that Nicholas Kristof, a former columnist for The New York Times, is not eligible to run as governor. He does not meet the state’s three-year residency requirement.

The Oregon election officials ruled Kristof didn't meet the requirements to run for the highest office in Oregon. They cited Kristof's vote in New York in 2020 as evidence.

Kristof had been pondering questions about his residency since October when he announced his candidacy. This was the same month that The New York Times reported that he had resigned. Oregon law requires that candidates for governor have lived in Oregon for at least three consecutive years prior to the election.

Kristof tweeted that the ruling was "of course, very disappointing."

He said, "But while my name won't appear on the ballots, I am not abandoning our State. I believe we can do better." Kristof, a two-time Pulitzer Prize Winner for years, was a columnist and foreign correspondent who traveled the world. His attempt to run for governor as a Democrat generated a lot interest. He has raised $2.7 Million in campaign donations.

Kristof, 62 years old, stated in a sworn declaration that he moved to Yamhill, Oregon in 1971 as a 12-year old with his parents and has called it his home since.

Since then, he has bought additional land in the area. His lawyers stated that he had paid taxes on the properties, and that he filed Oregon income tax returns 2019 and 2020.

Kristof was told by Lydia Plukchi, Compliance Specialist and Deborah Scroggin, Oregon Elections Director, that he had not met the constitutional requirements for a candidate for governor.

Kristof's lawyers told the Supreme Court that Kristof's secretary of state's expansive interpretation of the Constitution's requirements to be a governor could disadvantage candidates such as Kristof, who often travel and have multiple residences.

Kristof visited his Oregon home often after he moved away to Oxford and Harvard universities. He joined the Times in 1997.

Kristof was supported by three former Oregon secretaries to state. They stated in a newspaper opinion piece that "a person should presume to be a residence of the place(s) they consider home."

"It is evident that he considers Oregon home," Jeanne Atkins wrote, Bill Bradbury, and Phil Keisling, in reference to Kristof.

Since 1987, Oregon's governor's seat has been held by Democrats. Tina Kotek, Oregon House Speaker, and Tobias Read, state Treasurer are currently running for governor.

Kotek tweeted that Kristof will "continue to be important" as Oregon tackles its biggest problems after the ruling against Kristof was made. As a fellow Democrat, I look forward to working alongside him."

State Rep. Christine Drazan, ex-Republican nominee Bud Pierce, and Sandy Mayor Stan Pulliam are among the Republicans who are seeking to be nominated for their party's nomination.

Betsy Johnson, a former Democratic state senator, is now running as an Independent.

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