A hair's breadth from the catastrophe: Real Madrid attacks UEFA after a scandal game

The final of the Champions League should be a big football festival.

A hair's breadth from the catastrophe: Real Madrid attacks UEFA after a scandal game

The final of the Champions League should be a big football festival. But only the prudent behavior of the spectators prevented a great tragedy. Real Madrid's 1-0 win over Liverpool quickly fades into the background, especially in England. Real Madrid are now also demanding answers from UEFA.

Champions League winners Real Madrid defended their fans after the final chaos in St. Denis and called for the events to be clarified. "We want answers and explanations as to who is responsible for leaving the fans helpless and defenseless," said the Spanish record champions in a statement.

Instead of a football festival, the final of the premier class, which the royal team won 1-0 against Liverpool last Saturday, became an "unfortunate event" for many fans that caused "deep outrage worldwide". The final at the Stade de France in St. Denis was only kicked off 37 minutes late after there had been chaotic scenes around the stadium.

Long lines had formed in front of the entrances, there was a great crowd, and the police also used tear gas. Recordings had shown that "many of the fans had been violently attacked, harassed and robbed," wrote the Madrilenians: "Football has given the world an image that is far removed from the values ​​and goals that it must always pursue."

The incidents on Saturday resulted in a total of 238 injuries and 105 arrests, and around 2,700 fans with a valid ticket were unable to enter the stadium. According to the French government, a massive ticket fraud had led to the difficulties at the Stade de France. However, the relevant authorities were unable to provide any evidence of this.

Liverpool and England have been outraged since last Saturday by the allegations by the French government and UEFA, which initially blamed the fans' late arrival for the postponed kick-off. However, UEFA has since announced an independent investigation into the incidents.

Some Reds fans took to social media to share their traumatic experiences outside the stadium, which took them back to April 1989. Back then, a total of 97 Liverpool supporters lost their lives before an FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest. The boulevard then launched an unprecedented campaign against Liverpool. "The Sun" wanted to blame hooligans for the tragedy caused by police and security failures. A half-hearted apology followed 15 years later.

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