Oscars 2017: Political skits, speeches dominate show

As anticipated, politics played a considerable function in Jimmy Kimmel's opening monologue at the 2017 Academy Awards. Kimmel began off the night on a severe note, urging absolutely everyone watching the telecast to "attain out to a single individual you...

Oscars 2017: Political skits, speeches dominate show

As anticipated, politics played a considerable function in Jimmy Kimmel's opening monologue at the 2017 Academy Awards.

Kimmel began off the night on a severe note, urging absolutely everyone watching the telecast to "attain out to a single individual you disagree with and a have a good conversation."

He said that is what could "make America wonderful once again."

He later joked about subjects like Homeland Security, alluding to President Trump's immigration ban from earlier this year and touched on Trump's "overrated" tweet about Meryl Streep, stemming from her speech this year at the Golden Globe Awards.

Kimmel joked about the 20-time Oscar nominee's "mediocre early work" and "underwhelming" performances, adding that she's "phoned it in for much more than 50 films."

Then he created Streep get up for an "undeserved" standing ovation from the audience.

Immediately after a industrial break, Kimmel brought up the recent ban of particular news organizations from an off-camera White Property briefing final Friday.

"CNN, LA or NY Times ... please leave the building, we have no tolerance for fake news," he joked, adding that other "fake" products have been permitted.

The political theme continued as the speeches began, starting with the Italian winners of the Oscar for best makeup and hairstyling. "I am an immigrant," one of the winners declared, dedicating his Oscar to other immigrants and drawing a round of applause from the audience.

That was followed by the winner of the best documentary function. Producer and director Ezra Edelman accepted his award on behalf of victims of police violence, police brutality and criminal injustice. "This is their story as effectively as Ron's and Nicole’s," he mentioned, referring to murder victims Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown.

Politics at the Oscars dates back to 1973, when Marlon Brando sent Native American activist Sacheen Littlefeather to accept his best actor Oscar for "The Godfather." Brando was protesting the treatment of Native Americans. Littlefeather's appearance was met with boos and a smattering of applause. Similarly, persons have grumbled over the years as Sean Penn castigated those who voted for the ban on gay marriage in California and Michael Moore shamed President Bush for the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

But that flipped this year with the election of Trump.

Politics had been present even just before the get started of the broadcast, when stars turned up on the red carpet wearing blue ribbons in support of the American Civil Liberties Union. "Loving" star Ruth Negga, Lin-Manuel Miranda and his mother and model Karlie Kloss were amongst the starts wearing the ribbons.

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