Pride in London: More Than 1m people attend the 'biggest parade ever'

More than one million people took part in the 50th anniversary celebrations of the UK's first Pride Parade in London.

Pride in London: More Than 1m people attend the 'biggest parade ever'

More than one million people took part in the 50th anniversary celebrations of the UK's first Pride Parade in London.

Many LGBTQ+ groups participated in the march, which was held earlier from Hyde Park Corner up to Whitehall Palace.

As Pride returned, revellers wore face paints, glitter, jewels, and sequins to join the celebrations.

The event was hailed as the "most inclusive event" in history and featured performances by Samantha Mumba, Samantha Max, and Emeli Sande.

Parade participants paid tribute to the 1972 Gay Liberation Front (GLF) march and passed important sites of the UK's LGBTQ+ movement.

Park Lane was lined with flotillas ahead of the march through the capital. This was led by GLF activists carrying placards that read "I was there 1972".

The parade was not attended by uniformed officers of the Metropolitan Police, as they did in previous events.

In the wake of the inquests that concluded police failures "probably" contributed towards the deaths of Stephen Port's young victims, the force addressed concerns from the LGBTQ+ community.

Throughout the day, a line-up is performing on four stages in central London.

Sande, who is one of the performers, posted a story to her Instagram that showed her and Yoana Karemova as they were on their way soundcheck and then in Trafalgar Square where they prepared for the day's musical extravaganza.

Mohammed Nazir, 24, a member of Rainbows Across Borders' campaign group, stated that he wanted this year's pride be dedicated to all those who are still forced to conceal their sexuality.

Pride is self-affirmation and dignity. It's about equality. He said that it is a way to meet other LGBTQ people.

"Pride is a movement that fights for our rights."

Sadiq Khan, the Mayor of London, stated that there is still danger to the LGBTQ+ community.

The Labour mayor stated that he witnessed an attack on Oslo last week, just hours before the parade. Two people were killed and over 20 were hurt.

"So, we have to be aware that this community is still at risk of violence, discrimination and bias. He said that it was important for the community to have allies like him.

"We are marching today to promote an open and accepting world. We are marching today in Oslo for those who have not made the same progress as we have.

We are also marching today in love. This great city should be a beacon for inclusion, openness, and freedom.

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